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The 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 



^wm I fiands 



State Teachers College 

at 

Salem 



College Catalogue 



1959-1960 



Salem, Massachusetts 



Publication or this Document Approved by Bernard Solomon. 
State Purchasing Agent 
Form Ed. S.T.C. Salem 5. 1500-8-59-926010 

Estimated Cost Per Copy $ .22 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Faculty .... 

History .... 

The Salem Purpose 

Student Activities 

Requirements for Admission 

Requirements for Promotion and Graduation 

College Program of Instruction 

Curricula 

Elementary . 

Junior High . 

Business Education . . . . 

Description of Courses 
Departments 
Art . 

Business 

Earth Science 

Education 

English 

French 

Handwriting 

Health and Physical Education 

Mathematics 

Music 

Science 

Social Science 

Speech 



Page 

5 
7 
9 
10 
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23 
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27 
28 
32 
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41 
43 
43 
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48 
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52 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



at 



SALEM 



Founded in 1854 




Accredited by: 

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education 

Member of: 

American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education 

American Association of University Women 

Eastern States Association of Professional Schools for Teachers 

Massachusetts Council on Teacher Education 

New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

New England Teacher-Preparation Association 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

BOARD OF EDUCATION 

DR. JOHN W. McDEVITT, Chairman 
DR. LEO C. DONAHUE, Vice Chairman 
MR. JOSEPH SALERNO, Secretary 
DR. ALEXANDER BRIN 
MR. PHILIP J. DRISCOLL 
MRS. ALICE M. LYONS 
MR. STUART MACMILLAN 
DR. WILLIAM E. PARK 
MRS. ROBERT A. PEDERSON 

DR. OWEN B. KIERNAN, Commissioner of Education 

Division of State Teachers Colleges 

DR. D. JUSTIN MCCARTHY, Director 

DR. FRANCIS X. GUINDON, Assistant Director 

MR. EDWARD M. GILPATRICK, Business Agent 



PERSONNEL STAFF 

ANN K. CLARK 

State Normal School at Salem 

MARY M. O'KEEFFE . 

MARY E. JONES 

ARLENE M. ANDREWS 

ELAINE M. CALLOR . 

MARGARET M. KELLY 

ARTHUR W. O'NEIL, M.D. . 
Tufts College 

MARGARET D. WELCH, M.D. 
Tufts College 

MARY A. WARD, R.N. 
Lynn Hospital 



. Registrar 

. Secretary 
Bookkeeper 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
College Physician 

College Physician 

. College Nurse 



FACULTY 

Frederick A. Meier, B.S., M.S., D.H.S., President 



James T. Amsler, B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Ed.D. 

Michel J. Antone, B.A., M.A. 

Mildred Berman, B.S.Ed., M.A. 

Mary A. Bradley, B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Ed.D. 

Alfred J. Brudzynski, B.S., M.Ed., C.A.G.S. 

Gertrude Burnham, B.A., M.A. 

Francis E. Callan, B.S.Ed., B.S.L.S. 

Mary E. Casey, B.S.Ed., M.A. . 

James J. Centorino, B.A., M.A. 

Timothy F. Clifford, B.A., M.A., Ph.D 

Lorraine Coffey, B.A., M.A. 

Earle S. Collins, B.A., M.Ed. 

Albert S. Commito, B.S.Ed., M.Ed. 

Matthew Cooney, Jr., A.B., M.A., M.A. 

Margaret W. Dower, B.A., M.A., Ph.D 

Edwin L. Francis, B.A., M.A. 

J. Clifford Geer, B.S., M.Ed. 

Vincent N. Giannini, B.S., M.Ed. 

Joseph R. Giunta, B.S.Ed., M.A. . 

Serena G. Hall, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Roger A. Hardy, B.S., M.B.A. . 

D. Francis Harrigan, Jr., B.S.Ed. 

Leo F. Hennessey, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D 

Lillian M. Hoff, B.S., M.A. 

Bruce F. Jeffery, B.B.A., M.C.S., LL.B. 

Mary M. Jones, B.S.Ed., M.A., Ed.D. 

Helen J. Keily, B.B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D. 

Charles F. Kiefer, Jr., B.S.Ed., M.A. . 

Lawrence T. Lowrey, Ph.B. 

Alfred J. Lustri, B.A., M.Ed. 

Helen T. Mackey, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D. 



Marion S. Marshall, B.S.Ed., M.Ed. 
Carl Martini, B.S., M.A. . 
Edna M. McGlynn, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Minor H. McLain, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
George F. Moody, B.S.Ed., M.A., LL.B 

Viola I. Munyan, B.S.Ed., M.S. 
Stephen Panosian, B.S.Ed., M.Ed. 
Joseph M. Piemonte, B.A., M.A. 
Elizabeth D. Prescott, B.A., M.A. 
Mary A. Procopio, B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Ed.D 
Marie Quirk, B.S., M.Ed. . 
Richard O. Riess, B.A., M.A. 
V. John Rikkola, B.S.Ed., M.Ed. 
Thomas I. Ryan, B.A., M.S. 
Paul V. Salley, B.S.Ed., M.A. . 
Grant W. Seibert, B.A., M.S. 
Schuyler G. Slater, B.S., M.S. 
Janet Smith, B.A., B.S., M.C.S. 
Mildred B. Stone, B.S.Ed., M.A. 
James B. Sullivan, B.A., M.S., Ph.D. 

Joseph A. Sullivan, B.S.Ed., M.Ed. 
Tauno O. Tamminen, B.S.Ed., M.Ed. 
James E. Twohig, B.S.Ed., M.Ed. 
Mira Wallace, B.S.Ed., M.Ed. . 
Anthony P. Winfisky, B.S.Ed., M.Ed. 
Beatrice Witham, B.S., M.Ed., 
John T. Woodland, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 
Nicholas Xanthaky, B.A., M.C.S. 
Adele L. Younis, B.Ed., M.A. . 



Physical 



Dean o 



Chairman, El 



[5] 



Education 

Mathematics 

. Earth Science 

Education 

. Science 

. English 

. Assistant Librarian 

. English 

. Earth Science 

Music 

English 

. Social Science 

Education 

Physical Science 

. Social Science 

English, French 

Science, Audio-Visual Education 

Music 

Business Education, Geography 

. English 

. Business Education 

Handwriting 

Education 

Speech 

Chairman, Business Education 

Department 

Chairman, Junior High School 

Department, English 

Dean of Studies, Guidance 

. Social Science 

Men, Logic, Physical Education 

Education 

Assistant Dean of Women 

Physical Education 

Business Education, Speech 

Mathematics 

. Social Science 

. History 

Director of Training 

ementary Department, Education 

Education 
Art 
. History 
. English 
Education 
Physical Education for Women 
Geography 
Education 
Biological Science 
. Earth Science 
Librarian 
Chemistry, Physics 
Dean of Women, Business Education 

Mathematics 

Director of Admissions 

Biological Science 

Business Education 

Education 

Physical Education 

Physical Education 

Art 

Business Education 

. Science 

Business English 

. English 



TRAINING SCHOOL FACULTY 

V. John Rikkola, B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Principal 



Doris A. Cambridge, B.S.Ed. 
Mary V. Hourihan, B.S.Ed., M.Ed. 
Minerva M. Hudgins, B.S.Ed., M.Ed. 
Miriam E. Linskey, B.S., M.Ed. 

Agnes E. McCourt, B.S.Ed., M.Ed. 
Viola I. Munyan, B.S.Ed., M.S. 
William A. Rich, B.S.Ed., M.A. 
Esther L. Small, State Normal School, 
Ruth L. Southwick, B.S.Ed., M.Ed. 
Dorothy B. Stanley, B.S.Ed., M.Ed. 
Tauno O. Tamminen, B.S.Ed., M.Ed. 



Salem 



Supervisor, Grade Four 

Supervisor, Grade Five 

Supervisor, Grade Six 

Supervisor, Combination 

Grade Four and Five 

Supervisor, Grade One 

Home Economics 

Supervisor, Grade Eight 

Supervisor, Grade Seven 

Supervisor, Grade Three 

Supervisor, Grade Two 

Science, Manual Arts 



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HISTORY 

In 1854 the Board of Education selected Richard Edwards to initi- 
ate a school in Salem for the preparation of teachers. Dr. Edwards 
gave three years of excellent leadership here before going back to 
his native Midwest to head the Illinois State Normal University. Dr. 
Edwards came from Bridgewater Normal School where he had worked 
with Horace Mann who was then in his most active days of begin- 
ning teacher education in America. To succeed Dr. Edwards in 1857 
came Alpheus Crosby, a professor of Greek at Dartmouth. Dr. 
Crosby planted deeply in the tradition of Salem the importance of 
scholarship, and he is particularly remembered for his courage and 
strength of conviction during the Civil War. In 1865 he retired 
from the work of preparing teachers to become the editor of a news- 
paper, The Right of Way. 

Dr. Daniel B. Hagar came to Salem in 1865 and served for thirty- 
one years. Under Dr. Hagar came the development of many meth- 
ods, practice teaching for the Normal School student, and the use 
of the facilities of the Essex Institute and Peabody Academy of 
Science in the teacher-training program. As editor of The Massa- 
chusetts Teacher he placed Salem in a position of leadership in the 
profession and his personal influence still lives in the hearts of his 
pupils, now retired teachers among the Salem alumni. Dr. Walter 
Beckwith succeeded Dr. Hagar, coming in 1896 and serving until 
1906. It was during his administration that the Normal School was 
moved from Broad Street to its present site. Dr. Beckwith kept pace 
with advances in teacher training. 

In 1906 Dr. J. Asbury Pitman began his career of service to the 
cause of teacher education at Salem. The length of his service was 
thirty-one years, equalling Dr. Hagar in tenure of office. Many sig- 
nificant advances took place under his direct and forceful leader- 
ship, among them the change from a Normal School to a Teachers 
College, the establishment of the department of Business Education, 
the inauguration of the Junior High School Department, and the 
employment of a Training School principal. 

Dr. Edward A. Sullivan came to the College in 1937. Under Dr. 
Sullivan came expansion and accreditation by national and regional 
associations. His warm personality and wisdom contributed im- 
measurably to the state of growth in which the college began its 
second century. 

The seventh president is Dr. Frederick A. Meier who began his 
administration in April of 1954, coming to Salem from Bridgewater 
Teachers College where he was a professor of science and dean of 
men. 

During 1954-56 through the efforts of the Department of Educa- 
tion and the Massachusetts Legislature, positive steps were taken 
to meet the demand for teachers and the needs of the resulting in- 
creased enrollment at Salem Teachers College. A new library, audi- 
torium, gymnasium and administration building have been com- 
pleted and are ready for the fall semester. 

[7] 



The Emmerton Estate, to be used as a research center, has re- 
cently been added to the college. Money for plans has been ap- 
propriated for a new Business Education and Arts and Science Build- 
ing to be built on 3]/2 acres of land recently acquired on Lafayette 
Street. We look forward to the operation of these two new build- 
ings in the near future. 

Salem conducts a part-time graduate program leading to the 
Master of Education degree. The curriculum has been revised and 
strengthened and the faculty has been increased. Salem will con- 
tinue to lead in seeking out young people who have the ability and 
the desire to teach in elementary and junior high schools, and busi- 
ness education in high schools. 



[8] 



THE SALEM PURPOSE 

Subscribed to by the President and 
Faculty of the State Teachers College at Salem 

Education is the organized development of all the powers of a 
human being — spiritual, intellectual, emotional, social, and physi- 
cal. This development should be brought about by providing experi- 
ences which foster such knowledges, appreciations, and habits as 
will yield a character equal to the demands of existence in a demo- 
cratic society. 

Presupposing competent administration, the quality of a school 
depends essentially upon the quality of its faculty. Curricula, meth- 
ods, and procedures are important, but these ultimately reflect the 
preparation, character, and personality of the classroom staff. 
Therefore, school authorities should strive by all possible means to 
secure as teachers, men and women who are both broadly trained 
and adequately equipped in their fields, who possess the intellectual 
and moral prerequisites for their positions, who have a sympathetic 
understanding of and respect for young people, and who are sin- 
cerely devoted to the best interests of thsir own students. Such 
teachers always produce good schools. Good schools are axio- 
matically an invaluable instrument in civilized living. 

The State Teachers College at Salem, Massachusetts, is a tax- 
supported institution, accredited in the field of teacher preparation, 
and offering cultural and professional training of high quality. Our 
primary duty is to furnish teachers for service in the Commonwealth. 
We make every effort to discover, conserve, and develop the poten- 
tially superior student and to bring to fruition his abilities for con- 
structive accomplishment in public education. These ends ore 
achieved through classroom instruction, individual and group guid- 
ance, and such extracurricular activities as the cooperative associa- 
tion, dramatics, forensics, journalism, club work, and other social 
and leisure-time projects. The college is selective in that only the 
worthy may be graduated. 

The pure essence that is to be added to our educational system 
is that which has for its major purpose neither the filling of cate- 
gories with quantitative knowledge nor the communication of voca- 
tional skills but the awakening and developing of both science and 
humanities in a harmonious growth of all the higher faculties of man 
— the faculties of memory, imagination, intellect, will and, above 
all, the capacity for self education. 

Since we function under the auspices of the State, our institution 
has an unusual opportunity to disseminate the advantages of higher 
learning. It recognizes no parochial limitations, but seeks rather to 
extend its area of service as widely as possible. It encourages par- 
ticipation by faculty and students in programs of educational and 
social betterment sponsored by other progress-minded groups. It 
provides in-service and reorientation training through the medium 
of extension courses, because it recognizes a responsibility to teachers 
who feel the need of further supervised study or who realize that 
refresher work is imperative if they are to interpret modern life in- 
telligently and exercise a salutary influence on the thinking and 
ideals of American youth. 

[9] 



SALEM TEACHERS COLLEGE 






T 



i 



■ , 




STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

General Statement — A varied program of activities is carried on at 
the college with a fourfold purpose: recreation, social enjoyment, 
cultural opportunities, and training in leadership. There are so 
many clubs and groups that every student should be able to find 
one from which he may derive pleasure and profit. Besides, he will 
find his experience valuable when he assumes responsibility as a 
teacher in the activities program of his school. 

Arts and Crafts Club 

Association for Childhood Education 

Book Club 

Business Education Council 

Camera and Audio-Visual Council 

Circle K 

College Bookstore 

Cooperative Council 

Eastern Business Teachers Association 

Footlighters 

Glee Club 

International Relations Club 

Kappa Delta Phi 

Men's Athletic Association 

Pi Omega Pi 



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Publications: 

The Log 

The Clipper 

The Compass 
Religious Clubs: 

Godoles 

Newman Club 

Orthodox Club 

Salem Christian Association 
Salem Teachers College Aides 
Science Club 
Student N.E.A. 
Tri Mu 

Weather Club 
Women's Athletic Association 



Scholarships 

Through the generosity of graduates and friends of the college, 
several scholarships have been established. These are awarded to 
students on a basis of need. Applications should be made to the 
president after the opening of the college year. Scholarships are 
available from the following funds: 

Susan Marvin Barker Scholarship Fund 

Dr. Walter Parker Beckwith Scholarship Fund 

The Ella Franklin Carr Memorial Fund 

Alpheus Crosby Memorial Fund 

Richard Edwards Memorial Association Scholarship Fund 

Daniel Barnard Hagar Memorial Fund 

Louise O. Twombly Scholarship Fund 

Essex County Teachers Association Scholarship Fund 

Samuel and Bessie Alpers Scholarship Fund 

MASSACHUSETTS HIGHER EDUCATION ASSISTANCE 

CORPORATION 

Any student who is enrolled in the State Teachers Colleges, pur- 
suing a program of higher education, and who has satisfactorily 
completed the requirements of the first academic year is eligible 
for a HELP program loan. These HELP loans are limited to $500 
in any academic year. 

Any eligible student who wishes to apply for a HELP loan may 
do so by making application at the commercial bank of his choice 
in Massachusetts. 



[in 





[12] 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION EFFECTIVE 

SEPTEMBER 1, 1959 

The following new admission policy shall become effective for all 
students to be admitted to the Massachusetts State Teachers Col- 
leges or the Massachusetts School of Art on or after September 1, 
1959: 

I. General Qualifications 

Every candidate for admission as a regular student must meet 
the following requirements: 

1. Health. 

The candidate must be in good physical condition and free from 
any disease, infirmity, or other defects which would render him un- 
fit for public school teaching. A statement from the family physi- 
cian and examination by the college physician are required evi- 
dences in this regard. 

2. High School Graduation. 

Candidate must have a high school diploma or equivalent prepara- 
tion. 

3. Completion of Sixteen Units of High School Work. 

The "HIGH SCHOOL RECORD" must show the completion of 
sixteen units accepted by the high school in fulfillment of graduation 
requirements or the candidate must present evidence of equivalent 
preparation. 

"A unit represents a year's study in any subject of a secondary 
school so planned as to constitute approximately one-fourth of a 
full year of work for a pupil of normal ability. To count as a unit, 
the recitation periods shall aggregate approximately 120 sixty- 
minute hours. Time occupied by shop or laboratory work counts 
one-half as much as time in recitation." 

4. Personal Interview. 

A satisfactory personal interview of each candidate by faculty 
members of the college is required. 

5. Personal Characteristics. 

The results of the personal interview and the moral character of 
the candidate must, in the judgment of the President of the Teachers 
College, warrant the admission of the candidate. The recommenda- 

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tion of the high school principal will be given consideration in deter- 
mining the fitness cf the candidate for the profession of teaching. 

II. Submission of "Application for Admission" and "High School 
Record" 

Every candidate for admission to a State Teachers College or the 
Massachusetts School of Art is required to submit to the college of 
his choice: 

1. A completed form entitled "APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 
TO A STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE." 

2. Through the high school principal, his high school record on 
a form entitled "HIGH SCHOOL RECORD" which includes "RAT- 
INGS OF PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS." 

These forms may be obtained from the high school or college and 
should be filed early in the senior year. 

III. Time of Admission. 

1. Applicants may file an application and may be admitted pro- 
visionally under Plan I below on or after October 1 of the senior 
year. Final acceptance is contingent on the maintenance of a high 
school record for the first two marking periods or the first half of 
the senior year which meets the requirements for admission by aca- 
demic evaluation. 

Plan I candidates whose applications are received on or after the 
date of the administration of any examination may be admitted im- 
mediately if there is no waiting list (see VI). If there is a waiting 
list, the procedure outlined in VI applies. 

2. Applicants not granted provisional admission under Plan I 
may submit applications on or after October 1 of the senior year, 
but must await results of examination before being accepted for ad- 
mission. It is to the advantage of these candidates to submit their 
applications in advance of the first examination, but applications 
will be accepted for the succeeding examination. 

IV. Methods of Admission. 

A. Plan I. Admission by Academic Evaluation. 

The privilege of admission by academic evaluation is extended to 
public and private schools and academies in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. 

The Department of Education reserves the right to withdraw the 
privilege of admission by academic evaluation from any institution 
when its students fail to measure up to the standards required by 
the Department. The responsibility of the high school will continue 
through the freshman year in the Teachers Colleges. 

Admission by academic evaluation is granted to candidates as 
follows: On the basis of A=4, B=3, C=2, D=l, candidates who 

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have an average of not less than 3.0 in the highest 16 units of high 
school work will be admitted without examination. 

1. Prescribed — These 16 units must include the following 8 
units: 

English (including Grade XII) 4 units 

American History and Government 1 unit 

Algebra 1 unit* 

Geometry 1 unit* 

Biology, or Physics, or Chemistry 1 unit 

2. Distribution of units for Applicants Admitted by Evaluation. 

The units must be so distributed that the number offered in any 
field, including the prescribed units, shall not be more than the fol- 
lowing. 

English, 4 units; social studies, 4 units; science, 4 units; foreign 
languages, 5 units (no credit accepted for less than 2 units of any 
one language); mathematics, 4 units; business subjects, 2 units**; 
fine and industrial arts, 2 units**; home economics, 2 units**; and 
physical education, 1 unit***. 

B. Plan II. Admission by Examination. 

Students who are not eligible for admission by academic evalua- 
tion as described in the foregoing, but who possess a high school 
diploma or its equivalent, ore interested in teaching, and qualify 
under General Qualifications stated under I., may be admitted to the 
Teachers Colleges on the successful completion of aptitude and/or 
other tests prescribed by the Department of Education, provided 
they present high school credits in the following subjects: 

English through Grade XII 4 units 

American History and Government 1 unit 

Mathematics 2 units 

Science 1 unit 

The standing of the applicant will be determined by the exami- 
nation scores and the prescribed high school credits. 

Candidates may take examinations not more than twice for any 
academic year. 

V. Waiting Lists. 

If the number of applicants qualified for admission, following the 
administration of any of the entrance examinations, exceeds the 

*Only one unit of Algebra or Geometry is required for admission by academic evaluation to the 
Business Education course at the State Teachers College at Salem. 

I '*\n these fields one additional unit beyond the maximum may be granted as follows: In Busi- 
ness Education, Home Economics, Industrial Arts, Art and Music to candidates applying respec- 
tively for admission to the Business Education program at Salem, the Home Economics pro- 
gram at Framingham, the Industrial Arts programs at Boston and Fitchburg, all programs in 
the Massacchusetts School of Art, and the Music program at Lowell. 
**One unit granted for the Physical Education major program at Bridgewater only. 

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number that the facilities of the College will accommodate, a wait- 
ing list will be established. The position of a candidate on the wait- 
ing list will be determined as follows: 

A. Plan I candidates: 

The position of the candidate will be determined according to 
the numerical evaluation as described under IVA. 

B. Plan II candidates: 

The position of the candidate will be determined according to 
a numerical grade including an evaluation of the prescribed high 
school credits and the entrance examination score. 

The eight prescribed high school credits will be evaluated as fol- 
lows: 

A = 4 
B = 3 
C = 2 
D = 1 

Vacancies occurring between examinations will be filled from the 
established list. Candidates on a waiting list will have preference 
over all candidates (whether Plan I or Plan II) who become eligible 
for admission at subsequent examination dates. 

VI. Examinations. 

Students entering under Plan II will be required to take the Col- 
lege Entrance Examination Board Scholastic Aptitude Tests. These 
tests are given at convenient locations throughout the State and at 
the State Teachers College at Boston, Bridgewater, Salem, Westfield 
and Worcester. Information about other test centers should be ob- 
tained from college admissions officers, high school guidance coun- 
sellors or from the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New 
Jersey. 

VII. Admission as Advanced Students. 

Students who have attended or ore graduates of normal schools 
or colleges may be admitted as regular or advanced students, under 
conditions approved by the Department. 



[16] 



REQUIREMENTS FOR PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 

1. A system of quality points is in force in all of the State 
Teachers Colleges. Under this system, grades will be given the fol- 
lowing values: A = 4 to 5, B = 3 to 3.9, C = 2 to 2.9, D = 1 to 
1.9, E = 0. 

2. The number of quality points which a student receives in a 
course is determined by multiplying the total number of semester 
hours in the course by the corresponding number of quality points, 
e.g., a six-semester hour course with a rating of "A" has a value 
of 24 quality points. The average is computed by dividing the total 
number of quality points by the total number of semester hours. 

3. The average of the grades required for promotion or gradua- 
tion is two. Students with an average of less than two must with- 
draw from college unless permission to repeat the year is given by 
the Director of the Teachers Colleges on the recommendation of the 
President for such reasons as iilness, home difficulties, etc. 

Students with an average of less than 1 .5 at the end of any 
semester may be dropped from the college. They may be permitted 
to re-enter with permission of the Director of State Teachers Col- 
leges on the recommendation of the President, for such reasons as 
illness, home difficulties and similar circumstances. 

4. Incomplete grades must be made up within eight weeks after 
the opening of the following semester. (No course may be marked 
"incomplete" unless 80% of the work has been done at the time 
of discontinuance.) 

5. The determination of quality points is made at the end of 
each college year, and, excepting when the year is repeated, the 
number of points is not affected by grades in courses subsequently 
taken and passed. 

6. "E" grades can never be removed, but the subjects in which 
they have been received must be repeated and passed, or in the case 
of electives, other approved courses must be taken and passed either 
in approved summer sessions, or when possible, during the regular 
college year. Continuing subjects, in which "E" grades have been 
received, must be successfully repeated before the student may take 
advanced work. 

7. The grade for a repeated or alternate course will be recorded 
in the college records as follows: "Repeated or alternate course 

passed at 

(name) (college) 

with a grade of " 

EXPENSES 

The following summary indicates as nearly as possible the regular 
expenses for which each student must plan in an annual budget: 

[17] 



I. Fees for Residents of Massachusetts. 

1. $200.00 a year payable in two installments at the beginning 
of each semester. 

2. $7.00 a semester hour — Courses for part-time day students. 

3. $ 1 3 00 a semester hour — Extension and Summer Courses. 

4. $11.00 a semester hour — Auditor in Extension and Summer 
Courses. 

II. Fees for Non-Residents of Massachusetts. 

1. $600.00 a year payable in two installments at the beginning 
of each semester. 

2. $22.00 a semester hour — Extension and Summer Courses. 

3. $21.00 a semester hour — Courses for part-time day students. 

4. $11.00 a semester hour — Auditor in Extension and Summer 
Courses. 

III. Registration Fee. 

Each applicant for admission to a Massachusetts State Teachers 
College or the Massachusetts School of Art must pay a registration 
fee of $10.00 following notification of acceptance of admission. 
This fee will be deducted from the tuition of students who attend 
and will be forfeited by those who do not attend. Refunds for 
students leaving the college within six weeks after the beginning of 
the semester will be based on the regularly-established schedule of 
refunds, minus the registration fee. 

IV. Textbooks and Supplies. 

Students are expected to purchase all necessary textbooks and 
supplies, at an approximate expense of $75.00 a year. 

V. Other Expenses. 

1 . Club dues — $1 . 

2. Girl's gym outfit — $22. (approximate figure) 

3. Men's gym outfit — $8. (approximate figure) 

4. Class dues and social functions — $10. 

5. Cost of travel depends upon location and mode of travel. 

6. Board and room for non-commuting students $18.00 a week. 

7. Cooperative dues — $15. 

Each student has a chance to participate in some cooperative 
school service, for every student automatically becomes a member 
of the Cooperative Association when he pays his cooperative dues 
of $15.00. The cooperative dues are traditionally paid by every 
student in the college and should be paid on the day when the first 

[18] 



semester fee is due. The money collected is used to promote ac- 
tivities which will be of benefit to the college at large. 

As a member of the Cooperative Association each student has 
an opportunity to be a member of the Cooperative Council, to serve 
on various committees, to write for The Log, and to represent his 
college at various conventions. 

All payments must be made in advance, without the presenta- 
tion of bills. 

These regulations and charges are subject to change by the Board 
of Education. 



[19] 



COLLEGE PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION 

The instructional program of the college is conducted by thirteen 
departments: Art, Business Education, Earth Science, Education, Eng- 
lish, French, Handwriting, Health and Physical Education, Mathe- 
matics, Music, Science, Social Science, and Speech. 

While there is no foreign language requirement for graduation 
from the Teachers College, students are encouraged to elect French 
as a means of broadening their cultural interests. 

Elementary Education 

No field of teaching demands better professional preparation or 
more actual practice than the elementary school. The program 
requires the student to earn 128 semester hours of general educa- 
tion, professional education, and practice teaching. The student 
teaching in the junior year is carried out in the college-operated 
Horace Mann Training School. Here the student carries on a com- 
plete teaching program under expert supervision. 

Junior High School Education 

The Junior High program presents three areas of major and minor 
concentration — one in English and History, another in Social Sci- 
ence and Geography, and a third in General Science and Mathe- 
matics. In each case the student receives thirty semester hours in 
the major field of study and not less than eighteen semester hours 
in the minor field. This concentration is in addition to the required 
liberal and professional aspects of the program. The professional 
education courses make up about thirty semester hours of the total 
128 required for graduation. 

A brief summary of the semester hours offerings for an area of 
concentration in general science and mathematics is as follows: 

Freshman Biology 6, Mathematics 6 
Sophomore Climatology and Meteorology 6, Mathematics 6 

Junior Chemistry 6, Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry 4 
Senior Physics 6, Calculus 4, Genetics 3 
Thus, by combining the internship at the laboratory school with 
a program of study at the college, the student is able to receive thirty 
semester hours of pure science and twenty semester hours in pure 
mathematics. These fields of concentration are in addition to liberal 
education in history, English, art, music and a foreign language 
elective. 

Comparable concentration is available for the English-History ma- 
jors and the Social Science-Geography majors. 

Business Education 

The Business Education program at Salem aims to prepare busi- 

[20] 



ness teachers to understand the purposes and meet the needs of 
present-day business education in our secondary schools. 

The modern view of education is to regard it as the adjustment 
of the individual to his environment. Consequently, we must re- 
gard business education as the adjustment of the individual to his 
business environment. The Business Education program deals with 
the student as an individual and as a member of the community. 

It is the intent of these three curricula to give the student a gen- 
eral education founded on moral and spiritual values and a profes- 
sional training in the field of his choice. 

COLLEGE YEAR BEGINS 

September 14, 1959 September 12, 1960 



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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

The courses offered ore listed in alphabetical order according to 
departments. The numbering of these courses accords with the fol- 
lowing plan: 



Freshmen 
Sophomores 
Juniors 
Seniors 



101 
201 
301 
401 



up 
up 
up 
up 



DEPARTMENT OF ART 

Stephen Panosian, Chairman 
Tauno 0. Tamminen 
Anthony P. Winfisky 




Art 101. Introduction to Art 



2 semester hours 



This course deals with the essentials of visual art such as line, 
form, color, design, space and texture. Experimentation with mate- 
rials and approaches is encouraged. An understanding of visual arts 
is developed through illustrated lectures and comparisons with other 
forms of expression such as music and literature. 



[27] 



Art 102. Elements of Art Expression 2 semester hours 

This course aims to develop an understanding of the basic ele- 
ments of the visual arts and the materials utilized in their creation. 
In addition, significant periods of art expression such as Classical 
Renaissance and Baroque will be considered to determine their rela- 
tionship and how they affect contemporary art and current modes 
of expression. 

Art 110. Introduction to the Fine Arts 2 semester hours 

This course is concerned with the arts-architecture, sculpture, 
painting, music, literature, their relationships and place in life. The 
work of art is studied as to its nature and significance. Specific 
examples are analyzed and criteria considered to provide a basis for 
aesthetic judgment and evaluation. 

Art 201. Survey of Art 2 semester hours 

This course presents an analysis of the major forms of art, archi- 
tecture, sculpture, and painting. There is a study of the develop- 
ment of the types of expression in relation to the cultures of the past 
and present. 

Art 401. Art Appreciation and Crafts 6 semester hours 

A study is made of art forms which are encountered in everyday 
life. The fine arts, applied and industrial arts, the plastic and 
graphic arts are studied. Field trips are taken to the museums in 
Salem to afford the student an appreciation of the art forms in New 
England history. 

Art 462. Elementary School Handwork 1 semester hour 

This course is designed to teach the place of handwork in our 
elementary school curriculum. Emphasis is given to the use of tools, 
a knowledge of materials and their manipulation, and methods of 
employing these materials to enrich elementary school teaching. 



DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Bruce F. Jeffery, Chairman 
Joseph R. Giunta 
Roger Hardy 
Marion S. Marshall 
Janet Smith 
Joseph A. Sullivan 
Beatrice Witham 
Nicholas Xanthaky 

[28] 



Accounting 101. Introductory Course 6 semester hours 

This course deals with the fundamentals of bookkeeping, includ- 
ing the preparation of balance sheets, income statements, journals, 
ledger accounts, and other features of the bookkeeping cycle. The 
cycle is elaborated to include special journals and columns. Student 
discussion and problem solving are the primary methods used in this 
course although a few "sets" of complete problems are also included. 
Students with a better than average grade in one or more years of 
high school bookkeeping may be exempted from the first semester 
of this course upon the satisfactory completion of a qualifying ex- 
amination. They must, however, take an equivalent amount (3 
semester hours) of elective work. 

Accounting 201. Intermediate and Advanced Course 

6 semester hours 

This course deals with a continued study of the principles of ac- 
counting. Control accounts, partnerships, the voucher system, 
corporations and manufacturing accounts ore included. 

Accounting 401. A Course of Problems 2 semester hours 

This course consists of advanced problems based upon various 
business organizations. Progress depends upon the power of the 
class. An introduction to cost accounting, including job order and 
the process system, is part of the course. The course is for the 
specialist. 

Accounting 402. Auditing 2 semester hours 

This course aims to acquaint the student with the nature of audit- 
ing, auditing procedures, and the kinds of audits. In addition to the 
theory, there ore practical auditing problems presented. The pur- 
pose of the course is not only to learn new techniques of accounting 
but also to tax the student's resourcefulness in applying his present 
knowledge to actual auditing situations. 

Business 101. Business Mathematics 2 semester hours 

This course includes a review of fundamental operations, common 
fractions and billing, decimal fractions and percentage, interest and 
bank discount. Other topics included are: mathematics of insur- 
ance, trade and cash discount, reconciliation of bank statements, 
handling of checkbook, profit and loss, distribution of overhead, and 
individual income taxes. Some time is devoted to table work for use 
in compound interest and present value problems. 

Business 201. Business Organization 2 semester hours 

This course aims to give the student an understanding of the com- 

[29] 



ponent parts of the economic structure in general and of business 
enterprise in particular. The relationships among the functions of 
business, such as buying and banking, production and distribution, 
and of various business processes by which these functions serve con- 
sumers, constitute the subject matter of the course. Both large-scale 
and small-scale business operations are considered. 

Business 301. Business Law 6 semester hours 

This course deals with the unit subjects of contracts, agency, 
sales, negotiable instruments, partnerships, and business corpora- 
tions. It also includes incidental treatment of the history and de- 
velopment of our present-day law and judicial procedures. 

Business 305. Consumer Education 2 semester hours 

This course aims to give the student practical information and 
training as a basis for more intelligent living. It strives to establish 
a sense of values by teaching wise money management, discrimina- 
tion in buying, and the efficient consumer use of business services. 

Business 306. Distributive Education 2 semester hours 

This course undertakes an analysis of the fundamentals of retail 
selling from the point of view of the merchant and salesperson. A 
study is made of distributive education courses as they operate in 
the modern secondary school. Store and school visits and individ- 
ual student selling experience provide bases for class application of 
principles. 

Business 307. General Business Training 2 semester hours 

This course integrates appropriate elements from several business 
subjects. Business knowledge, ideals, and attitudes that will help 
the student to participate in the modern business world result from 
the study of such topics as money, banking, insurance, thrift, trans- 
portation, investments, and communication. 

Office Practice 201. 3 semester hours 

This course aims to teach the fundamental principles of such 
office machines as duplicators, calculators, adding-listing machines, 
and dictating and transcribing machines. Part of the time is devoted 
to the study and practice of various methods of filing. The prob- 
lems of the small high school relative to limited equipment are con- 
sidered. 

Shorthand 202. Gregg Shorthand Principles 4 semester hours 

This course for the beginning shorthand student is based on the 
principles of Gregg Shorthand Simplified. Emphasis is placed upon 

[30] 



the automatization of brief forms and a thorough mastery of short- 
hand theory as essential to the development of reading and writing 
skills. Students with a better-than-average grade in two or more 
years of high school shorthand may be exempted from this course 
upon the satisfactory completion of a qualifying examination. They 
must, however, take an equivalent amount (4 semester hours) of 
elective work. 

Shorthand 302. Principles, Dictation, and Transcription 

6 semester hours 

This course reviews all of the principles of Gregg Shorthand, and 
stress is put on developing a wide shorthand vocabulary. Dictation 
of business letters is emphasized with the objective of developing 
a minimum speed of 80 words a minute in ordinary business dicta- 
tion. Transcription is included in the second semester. 

Shorthand 401. Secretarial Techniques 3 semester hours 

This course aims to build speed in taking dictation. Vocabulary 
building is stressed. A minimum dictation speed of 100 words a 
minute is the goal toward which the course is directed. Transcrip- 
tion is continued one period a week throughout the course. 

Typewriting 101. Foundation Course for Beginners 

4 semester hours 

This course emphasizes correct typewriting techniques as a foun- 
dation for accuracy and skill. Practice is given in arranging busi- 
ness letters, addressing envelopes, using carbon paper, copying from 
simple rough drafts, making simple tabulations, and other exercises 
involving the typewriting of practical business materials. Accuracy 
and speed tests are given weekly. Students with a better than aver- 
age grade in one or more years of high school typewriting may be 
exempted from the first semester of this course upon the satisfactory 
completion of a qualifying examination. They must, however, take 
an equivalent amount (2 semester hours) of elective work. 

Typewriting 201. Typewriting Projects 3 semester hours 

This course provides experience on all makes of typewriters. Ad- 
vanced typewriting problems involving difficult tabulations, prepara- 
tion of manuscripts, legal forms, stencil cutting, master copies, and 
other exercises requiring the use of vocational typewriting skill are 
presented. Production-type tests are given frequently. 

[31] 



DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCE 

Paul V. Salley, Chairman 
Mildred Berman 
James J. Centorino 
Richard O. Riess 

Earth Science 102. Climatology and Meteorology 

6 semester hours 

This is a basic course for these interested in geography and sci- 
ence. A study is made of the phenomena in the natural world in 
which we live: rocks and minerals, volcanoes, earthquakes, moun- 
tain-building, streams, ground water, waves and ocean currents, 
glaciers, wind action, weather and climate. Throughout the course 
emphasis is directed to the location and interpretation of these phe- 
nomena on maps, pictures and diagrams. 

Geography 201. Principles of Geography 6 semester hours 

This course is basic for advanced regional and systematic geog- 
raphy studies. It explains the influence on man's life of contrasting 
climate features of diverse land and water forms and of various ele- 
ments of location. 

Geography 202. World Geography 4 semester hours 

This course aims to develop an appreciation of the global con- 
cept of geography and to create an awareness of and sympathetic 
understanding for man's regional problems as influenced by his 
physical environment and expressed in his culture. 

Geography 203. Geography of Europe 3 semester hours 

(See Geography 310) 

Geography 306. Elements of Geography 3 semester hours 

A study is made of selected environmental conditions and their 
influence on man's activities. It gives a working knowledge of the 
interdependence of nations and peoples. 

Geography 307. Fundamentals of Economic Geography 

3 semester hours 

This is an introductory course based on the distribution of the 
major economic resources of the earth. Location, availability, mar- 
keting, and transportation factors are discussed for a selected group 
of commodities. 

[32] 



Geography 309. Geography of North America 3 semester hours 

This course gives the student an appreciation of the cultural pros- 
perity of North America. A regional analysis of the continent is 
made to explain the interrelationships that exist between man's 
physical environment and his cultural patterns. 

Geography 310. Geography of Europe 3 semester hours 

This course is a study of the physical and economic contrasts 
within the major political divisions of this continent. Emphasis is 
placed on current happenings in Europe. 

Geography 311. Geography of Asia 2 semester hours 

This course is a study of the physical and economic contrasts 
dominating the great land mass of Asia. Political divisions are ex- 
amined and emphasis is placed on relationships within the conti- 
nent as well as with other continental regions. 

Geography 312. Geography of Latin America 3 semester hours 

This course attempts to give students an understanding of existing 
physical and social factors that influence the economic development 
of Latin-American republics. A regional analysis is made of all the 
Latin-American lands south of the Rio Grande. 

Geography 405. Geography of the Southern Continents 

3 semester hours 

This course makes a study of the principal geographic regions of 
the southern continents of South America, Africa, and Australia. 

Geography 406. Economic Geography 3 semester hours 

This course deals with the distribution of the world's population. 
Specific problem areas are considered prior to a detailed study of 
the major productive occupations. Emphasis is given to aspects of 
fishing, forestry, agriculture, mining, and manufacturing within the 
framework of inter-nation trade and transportation. 

Geography 407. Geography of Eurasia 3 semester hours 

This course is designed to treat the major political and economic 
problem areas included within the vast continental expanse of Eu- 
rasia. The geographical background and current political happen- 
ings in regard to specific areas are discussed and studied in detail. 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

George F. Moody, Chairman 

[33] 



James T. Amsler 
Mary A. Bradley 
Albert S. Commito 
Leo F. Hennessey 
Helen J. Keily 
Alfred J. Lustri 
Viola I. Munyan 
Mary A. Procopio 
V. John Rikkola 
Tauno O. Tamminen 

Education 102. General Psychology 3 semester hours 

This course gives a survey of psychology; its purposes are to ac- 
quaint the student with the terminology of the subject, to introduce 
the student to the phenomena of consciousness and behavior, and to 
emphasize the importance of the adjustment of the individual to 
his social environment. It is also a foundation for the study of 
Educational Psychology. 

Education 203. Educational Psychology 3 semester hours 

— Child Growth and Development 

This course surveys the physical, emotional, social, intellectual, 
spiritual and aesthetic growth of children. Special emphasis is 
placed on the physiological changes and the psychological problems 
which the child may experience before reaching adolescence. 

Education 204. General Teaching Methods 4 semester hours 

The student prepares for his first experience in teaching. He 
studies social objectives in education; the teacher as a social being; 
principles of study; use and selection of textbooks; selection and or- 
ganization of subject matter; lesson types; questioning; lesson and 
unit planning. 

Education 205. Principles of Logic 3 semester hours 

This course is a study of the science of correct thinking, the 
canons and criteria of right reasoning. Specific personal and educa- 
tional problems are considered and interpreted with a view to guid- 
ing the student toward a practical application of principles of logic. 

Education 206. Educational Psychology — The Adolescent 

3 semester hours 

This course is designed to present a comprehensive picture of the 
adolescent along the lines of physical, mental, emotional, spiritual, 
and social growth. Attention is given to the case study technique. 
Emphasis is placed on the problems of adolescents and their con- 
comitant implications for teachers in secondary education. 

[34] 



Education 301. Educational Psychology — The Adolescent 

(See Education 206) 3 semester hours 

Education 302. Supervised Student Teaching 6 semester hours 
in the Training School — Elementary 

The Horace Mann Training School serves as a laboratory in which 
students engage in the directed study of children, in teaching and in 
learning situations as they are encountered in a modern school. As 
the study progresses, students participate increasingly in the activ- 
ities of the school to the point at which they can undertake the duties 
of the room teacher. Included in this course are several hours weekly 
of conferences with supervisors, principal of the school, and the 
director of training. Such topics as school register, school book- 
keeping, guidance, school laws, caring for individual differences, 
and the improvement of lesson planning are discussed. 

Education 324. Guidance in Business Education 2 semester hours 

This course provides an introduction to the principles and prob- 
lems of educational and vocational guidance and a study of their 
application to individual junior and senior high school situations. 

Education 334. Elementary School Curriculum 8 semester hours 
Materials (Including Audio-Visual Aids) 

This course deals with methods and techniques in the use of spe- 
cific materials in six subject-matter areas of the elementary school. 

Elementary School Art 

This course develops an understanding of the place of art in the 
elementary curriculum. Materials and media suitable for this level 
are explored with emphasis on creative experiences in line, form, 
color and texture. 

Handwriting 

A study is made of the types of copy used in the various grades 
and emphasis is placed on arranging work and writing in a straight 
line. Methods of teaching handwriting, conducting remedial work, 
and correlation are also included. 

Language Arts in the Elementary School 

Study is given to the trends in the teaching of speaking, listening, 
and writing in the elementary school. The basic skills of oral and 
written composition are stressed. 

[35] 



Mathematics 

This course includes selection, grade placement, and organization 
of subject matter; adaptation of drill and other learning procedures 
to individual differences; the place of mathematics in the integrated 
program, collection and use of teaching materials; techniques for 
developing concepts and understanding of mathematical principles; 
testing and remedial procedures. 

Elementary School Music 

This course presents the theory and practice of school music teach- 
ing. Lectures, demonstrations, and practice teaching in the class- 
room and in the training school are planned to develop security in 
guiding a five-fold music program. 

Reading Methods and Materials 

The course centers about methods and materials used in teach- 
ing elementary reading. Emphasis is placed on reading readiness, 
word-recognition techniques, pupil grouping and the evaluation of 
individual progress. 

Science 

The course treats the following topics: a philosophy of elementary 
school science; general objectives of the elementary school science 
program; methods to be used in teaching elementary science; organ- 
izing a science program; and problems for the beginning science 
teacher. 

Social Studies 

The history and geography segments of the curriculum materials 
course are based upon the development of major units of work. Em- 
phasis is placed on the particular activities suitable for the teaching 
of these social studies at the elementary level and on the texts and 
materials necessary to the work. 

Education 335. Tests and Measurements 3 semester hours 

This course presents the terminology used in tests and measure- 
ments essential for the classroom teacher. A study is made of ele- 
mentary statistics, functions and forms of various tests and the uses 
of test results. 

Education 336. Developmental Reading in the 3 semester hours 
Secondary School 

This course is designed to help teachers to understand the develop- 
mental reading process with particular reference to junior high school 

[36] 



pupils. The course content includes study of the following topics: 
the need for reading instruction for all pupils in the secondary school; 
the responsibilities of each subject teacher for reading instruction; 
methods, materials, and activities in teaching advanced, average, 
and slow learners; specific techniques in developing word recogni- 
tion, word meaning, comprehension, study skills, adjustment of speed 
of reading to purpose, and evaluation of reading progress. 

Education 337. Junior High School Curriculum 

This course deals with methods and techniques in the use of spe- 
cific materials in the major and minor fields of concentration, and 
of students in the junior high curriculum. 

English 3 semester hours 

This course considers methods for teaching the various aspects 
of the junior high English program: speaking, written communica- 
tion, and literature. Curriculum materials and evaluative criteria 
for judging these materials are presented. 

Geography 3 semester hours 

This course acquaints the student with specific techniques and 
skills that he might use to teach geography effectively in the junior 
high school. Specific methods (textbook method, problem method, 
activity method) are employed in the course, and students have an 
opportunity to analyze those respective methods for distinctive ad- 
vantages and possible limitations. The course aims to be instru- 
mental in constructing a functional list of free and inexpensive 
teaching aids that will prove useful in the teaching of geography. 

Mathematics 3 semester hours 

This course emphasizes the contributions of mathematics to the 
major objectives of education; specific objectives in the teaching of 
mathematics; organization of subject matter for teaching; tech- 
niques for developing concepts and understandings of mathematical 
principles; adaptation of drill to individual differences, procedures 
for maintaining growth in mathematical judgments — including 
problem solving, plans for establishing effective work habits; test- 
ing; diagnostic, and remedial procedures; collection and use of teach- 
ing aids. 

Science 3 semester hours 

This course deals with the principles of science teaching; e.g., the 
philosophy of science teaching, the selection and organization of 
materials for teaching science, and the techniques of instruction in 
science for the junior high school. Equipment and sensory aids in 
science teaching are discussed. 

[37] 



Social Science — History and Citizenship 3 semester hours 

This course deals with the following considerations: the specific 
functions of history and citizenship education in the total program 
of the junior high school; current trends and patterns in the selec- 
tion and organization of content; techniques of curriculum forma- 
tion and revision; and analysis of widely-used procedures. 



Education 339. Principles of Business Education 

2 semester hours 

This course deals with a study of the origin, development and 
present status of business education in various types of institutions 
It includes a general survey of high school business education; the 
contribution of business education to general education; training for 
various business occupations; development of courses of study in 
business education; and a consideration of present-day methods of 
instruction in business subjects. 

Education 340. Observation and Supervised 2 semester hours 

Student Teaching in Training School — Junior High 

The upper grades of the Training School are used for demonstra- 
tion and supervised teaching. Conferences are held with supervising 
teachers at which the following problems are discussed: organization 
and control; planning; techniques; testing; classroom economy; 
school bookkeeping; classifying; marking and promoting; school 
laws; and clubs. 



Education 401. History and Philosophy of Education 

3 semester hours 

This course surveys the history and philosophy of education, em- 
phasizing the contributions made by outstanding educators of Europe 
and America. A study is made of the main philosophical beliefs of 
the founders of various educational systems. 

Education 402. Supervised Student Teaching in the Public Schools 
— Elementary and Junior High 6 semester hours 

This course is a practice-teaching period which provides oppor- 
tunity in the public schools for continuous supervised experience in 
all classroom activities under regular classroom conditions. Experi- 
ence is gained in the study of individual differences, teaching tech- 
niques, and classroom management. Supervision is given by the 
classroom teacher and by members of the college faculty. The stu- 
dents return to the college for two conference days during the eight- 
week period. 

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Education 402B. Supervised Student Teaching in the Public Schools 
— Business Education 6 semester hours 

This course is a practice-teaching period for seniors in the Busi- 
ness Education Department who are assigned to selected high schools 
for an eight-week period of observation and student teaching. They 
are supervised continuously by the high school business teachers, 
and their work is periodically appraised by members of the Business 
Education Department instructional staff of the college. Students 
return to the college for two conference days during the eight-week 
period. 

Education 425. Methods of Teaching Bookkeeping 

2 semester hours 

This course deals with the techniques of instruction in the field 
of bookkeeping. The material includes historic background, place 
and scope of bookkeeping in the high school curriculum, and teach- 
ing and learning tools such as visual and auditory aids, aptitude 
tests, achievement tests, lesson plans and practice in test making. 

Education 426. Method of Teaching Geography in High School 

2 semester hours 

This course surveys the geography courses taught in high schools. 
High school texts, selection of maps, use of current material, and 
methods and techniques of presenting geographic material are con- 
sidered. 

Education 428. Methods of Teaching Shorthand 

2 semester hours 

This course is designed to give students a background for the use 
of the two most commonly accepted methods of teaching Gregg 
Shorthand. The course will acquaint the student with textbooks and 
sources of dictation materials and give some information about prog- 
nostic tests. 

Education 429. Methods of Teaching Typewriting 

2 semester hours 

This course deals with the fundamentals of skill-learning as ap- 
plied to typewriting. Units of work include the various methods of 
learning the keyboard, diagnosis of common errors, remedial teach- 
ing drills, speed and accuracy drills, testing, grading, selection of 
typing textbooks, and the correlation of transcription in the type- 
writing class. 

Education 445. Audio-Visual Education 2 semester hours 

This course is planned to include the study of the important audio- 

[39] 



visual aids employed in modern teaching. The nature of materials 
for subject enrichment, selection and evaluation in terms of units of 
work, and techniques of classroom use are discussed. Some atten- 
tion will be given to organization and administration of an audio- 
visual program. Students will be given an opportunity to operate 
projectors and other audio-visual equipment and to acquaint them- 
selves with sources of information on filmstrips, film and other 
teaching aids. 

Education 446. Professional Ethics 1 semester hour 

This course is concerned with a study of the meaning and im- 
portance of ethics to teachers. Special emphasis is placed upon the 
study of the development and current use of ethical codes in the 
professions. Cedes of ethics for teachers are given particular con- 
sideration, with application to case situations. 

Education 451. Principles of Guidance 2 semester hours 

The course provides an introduction to the principles of guidance 
and a consideration of their operation in programs of public schools. 

Education 458. Home Economics 1 semester hour 

This course is an introduction to home economics aimed to help 
the student in her personal living; to provide suggestions that she 
can use as a classroom teacher in the promotion of health and worthy 
home membership; and to give information that will be useful to her 
as a future home-maker. Units touch on consumer buying of foods 
and clothing; modern trends in home planning; and a study of basic 
nutritional needs and how to meet them. A limited amount of 
laboratory work is included. 

Education 459. Tests and Measurements 3 semester hours 

This course considers the history and development of standardized 
tests. Emphasis is placed on the construction of teacher-made tests, 
their scoring and interpretation of results. Attention is given to 
marking and reporting pupil progress. 

Education 461. Principles and Practices in 2 semester hours 

Secondary Education 

This course traces the development of secondary education in the 
United States. It is concerned with general principles of secondary 
education; the everyday problems of teaching; methods and current 
practices related to recent developments in the curriculum area; 
diagnosis of learning difficulties; lesson plans and assignments of 
various types; discipline and classroom management; the evalua- 
tion of outcomes. 

[40] 



Education 464. Education for Citizenship 3 semester hours 

The purpose of this course is to stimulate active citizenship by an 
evaluation and appreciation of the basic concepts of our democratic 
way of life. It aims to help the student to select the best possible 
course of civic action available to him as an adult. 

Education 465. Important Issues in Education 

(Required of all Seniors) 

This course concerns itself with discussion of issues of significance 
in the education offered by the free schools of the Republic and fac- 
tors related to that education. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Gertrude Burnham, Chairman 
Francis E. Callan 
Mary E. Casey 
Matthew W. Cooney, Jr. 
Edwin L. Francis 
Serena G. Hall 
Mary M. Jones 
Elizabeth D. Prescott 
Adele L. Younis 

English 101. Composition and Literary Types 6 semester hours 

This course is designed to teach students to write clear and correct 
English and to develop a basic knowledge of the novel, drama, and 
poetry. The emphasis is on composition. 

English 102. Composition 6 semester hours 

This is a required course for English majors. It will present a 
study of the relations of language, meaning, and logic through the 
analysis of the word, the sentence, the paragraph, and the whole 
composition. There will be practice in the four methods of dis- 
course, in writing the familiar, the factual, and the interpretative 
essay, in reviews and critiques, and in the short story. 

English 201. Survey of English and American Literature 

6 semester hours 

This course surveys the growth and development of English and 
American Literature through a study of major writers. Readings 
serve as a basis for discussion of the cultural background. 

English 202. World Classics 6 semester hours 

This course emphasizes the contribution of literature of the West- 

[41] 



em world to our heritage. Representative works written during the 
great periods of literary and intellectual development are read in 
their entirety. 

English 203. A Survey of English Literature 6 semester hours 

This course, required of English majors, will present selected works 
of English literature in sequence of literary periods, with particular 
attention to the major writers. The social and political background 
of the periods will be presented. 

English 304. Contemporary Literature 5 semester hours 

This course is designed to develop an understanding and critical 
evaluation of contemporary literature. Current influences and 
trends in the drama, fiction, poetry, and biography are analyzed. 

English 305. Creative Writing 5 semester hours 

The aim of this course is to promote initiative in self-expression. 
Students are encouraged to develop original ideas, inclinations, and 
preferences in working out their writing problems. Individual con- 
ferences and constructive criticism are essential elements of the 
working procedure. 

English 306. A Survey of American Literature 6 semester hours 

This course, required of English majors, offers a survey of Ameri- 
can literature that will serve as a basis for specialized courses. The 
emphasis is on major authors. 

English 401. Shakespeare 6 semester hours 

This course, required of English majors, gives students a knowl- 
edge of Shakespeare's life, familiarity with typical plays of the 
periods of his dramatic career, and an acquaintance with the son- 
nets and long poems. Shakespeare is studied as dramatist and poet 
in relation to the Elizabethan Age. 

English 402. Contemporary Literature 6 semester hours 

This course is required of English majors. (See English 304) 

English 403. Junior High School Literature 2 semester hours 

This course aims to acquaint students in the junior high school 
curriculum with the wealth of literature available for children of 
junior high school age. It covers the history of children's literature 
and places considerable emphasis on contemporary books, their au- 
thors, and illustrators. 

[42] 



English 404. Children's Literature 3 semester hours 

This course aims to present standards for selecting literature for 
school children, to acquaint the student with available material and 
to evaluate it in the light of established standards and present-day 
trends. 

English 405. World Classics 6 semester hours 

This course is an elective for Elementary seniors. (See English 
202) 

English 406. History of English Language 2 semester hours 

This course introduces the student to the science of the English 
language, covering the following major problems: the nature of lan- 
guage, the historical development of English, the development of the 
English sounds, and the basic theories affecting good usage. 

DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH 

Edwin L. Francis, Chairman 

French 301. Written and Oral Expression 5 semester hours 

This course is a review of French grammar with particular em- 
phasis on difficult constructions. Drill in the use of idioms and the 
translation of texts dealing with French life and customs as well as 
with the geography and history of France are stressed. (Prerequisite 
— two years of French.) 

French 401. Contemporary French Theater and Novel 

6 semester hours 

This course is a study of prewar and postwar tendencies with 
particular emphasis on plays and novels. Oral and written reports 
are made. 

DEPARTMENT OF HANDWRITING 

D. Francis Harrigan, Jr., Chairman 

Handwriting 101. Fundamentals of Handwriting 

1 semester hour 

This course is compulsory for Business Education and Elementary 
freshmen. It is designed to improve and develop personal writing 
ability through self analysis and directed practice. The mechanics 
of writing, standard letter forms (both cursive and manuscript) are 
studied and practiced, and the recognized essentials of good hand- 
writing are stressed. 

[43] 



Handwriting 305. Blackboard Writing and Handwriting Methods 

1 semester hour 

This course for Business Education juniors seeks through super- 
vised practice to develop the ability to write good blackboard copy. 
A study is made of the types of copy used in business and emphasis 
is placed on arranging work, correlation, and the writing of good 
business copy. 

Handwriting 427. Advanced Course in Lettering and Engrossing 

1 semester hour 

This course in text-lettering is planned for general classroom use, 
the making of resolutions and honor rolls, and use in diploma filling. 
Practice in the various styles of text-lettering, color, and basic illumi- 
nation are included. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical Education for Women 

Mira Wallace, Chairman 
Helen T. Mackey 
Marie Quirk 

Physical Education for Men 

Lawrence T. Lowrey, Chairman 
James E. Twohig 

Physical Education 101. (M) Activities 

This course provides general gymnasium work, including correc- 
tive and remedial exercises, marching tactics, group contests, sports 
and games. 

Physical Education 101. (M) Physiology 1 semester hour 

This course aims to stimulate students to think for themselves in 
matters of human function and health behavior and to present the 
physiological background for proper health habits. 

Physical Education 101. (W) Activities 

This course is designed to give fundamental techniques, rules, and 
principles in all important phases of physical activities. Special at- 
tention is given to individual needs, as determined by physical ex- 
aminations given upon admission. Individual and team games and 
sports, square, tap, and social dancing, and body mechanics are 
stressed. 

[44] 



Physical Education 101. (W) Physiology 1 semester hour 

This course is a study of the fundamental aspects of healthy adult 
living, including the factors pertaining to adult hygiene. The course 
aims to encourage improvement of individual health habits and their 
adaptation to adult environment. 

Physical Education 201. (M) Activities 

This course is an intensification of the program of the freshman 
year with particular stress on major sports. Attention is directed 
toward those qualities which characterize the successful teacher of 
physical education. 

Physical Education 201. (M) First Aid. Athletics in Education 

1 semester hour 

The Standard Red Cross First Aid Course is studied. Those pass- 
ing the course receive a certificate from the American Red Cross. 

This course deals with the place of play and group games in educa- 
tion. It considers the need for recreational games, and methods of 
teaching them at the elementary and secondary level. 

Physical Education 201. (W) Activities 

This course aims to increase skill and achievement in the con- 
tinuation of all activities. Opportunities are provided to coach, 
teach, and officiate at games and develop powers of leadership. 

Physical Education 201. (W) First Aid, Coaching and Officiating 

1 semester hour 

The Standard Red Cross First Aid Course is studied. Those pass- 
ing the course receive a certificate from the American Red Cross. 
Techniques of coaching and officiating at team games and group 
activities will be presented for the upper elementary, junior and sen- 
ior high school levels. 

Physical Education 321. Health Education 1 semester hour 

This course includes the study of school health education mate- 
rials, activities, and teaching procedures. Emphasis is placed upon 
the teacher's part in the health guidance of the school child. 

Physical Education 456. (Men) Advanced Sports: 1 semester hour 
Leadersip, Coaching and Officiating 

This course is designed for students who wish to improve their 
training and to obtain experience in coaching and officiating the 
major sports. Participation will be provided in organizing, coach- 
ing and officiating games at varying age and grade levels. 

[45] 



Physical Education 456. (Women) Advanced Sports: Leadership, 
Coaching and Officiating 1 semester hour 

This course is adapted to the anticipated needs of participants. 
Sports and recreational activities are carried on, with special em- 
phasis on methods of organization and leadership, as well as per- 
sonal anticipation. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Mildred B. Stone, Chairman 
Michel J. Antone 
Alfred J. Brudzynski 
Carl Martini 

Mathematics 104. Introduction to Mathematics 

3 or 6 semester hours 

This course includes the topics which are customarily found in 
General Education; the principles underlying arithmetic with special 
attention to the number system, measurement, ratio, and variation; 
ways of expressing functional relationships; operations of algebra 
growing out of equations and formulas; logarithm slide rule; geom- 
etry of shape, size, and position including indirect measurement; 
principles underlying trigonometry; interpretation of statistical data. 

Mathematics 205. College Algebra 6 semester hours 

This course is designed to give technical competence in the funda- 
mental operations of algebra, to develop a degree of mastery in the 
solution of equations, to introduce new concepts in progressions, com- 
plex numbers, and to strengthen skills in problem solving. This 
course will provide the necessary background for further work in the 
field of mathematics. 

Mathematics 206. Social-economic Mathematics 

3 semester hours 

Social-economic Mathematics comprises the major subject matter 
area of the seventh and eighth grades. Effective teaching of this 
content requires information relating to kinds of banks and their 
services, sources of consumer credit, budgeting, personal and prop- 
erty insurance and taxatim. 

Mathematics 304. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry 

4 semester hours 

This course includes the functions of angles, the solution of right 
and of oblique triangles, general formulas and logarithms, the study 

[46] 



of Cartesian co-ordinates, straight line, circle, parabola, ellipse, 
hyperbola, polar co-ordinates, transformation of co-ordinates, tan- 
gents, and normals. 

Mathematics 305. Mathematics of Finance 2 semester hours 

This course is based upon the problems of the beginning teacher. 
Budgeting, effective choice making, wise buying, savings and invest- 
ment, installment buying, use of checking account, and insurance 
are included. 

Mathematics 403. Calculus 4 semester hours 

This course deals with the meaning of derivatives; the value and 
development of formulas and their application to problems involving 
slopes, rates, and velocities; and the meaning and use of integration. 

Mathematics 405. Advanced Mathematics 6 semester hours 

This course is elementary in nature and will contain selected 
topics in advanced arithmetic, elementary algebra, and basic geom- 
etry. Topics will include various logarithms for shortening work in 
arithmetic, time-savers in multiplication and division; line relation- 
ships, similarity, congruency, and symmetry in geometry; algebra 
through quadratics and modern algebra. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Timothy F. Clifford, Chairman 
Vincent N. Giannini 

Music 101. Introduction to Music 2 semester hours 

An acquaintance with music as a fine art, and development of 
singing and listening skills on the adult level are the objectives of 
this course. 

Music 102. Survey of Music 2 semester hours 

This is a listening course which surveys the music of the Americas 
and Europe, tracing the growth of music country by country. Cor- 
relation of music with literature and social studies is stressed. 

Music 201. Elementary Music Experiences 1 semester hour 

This course is planned to develop those skills required to teach 
music in the elementary grades; singing rote songs, sight reading, 
playing piano, autoharp, rhythm instruments, and melody instru- 
ments. 

[47] 



Music 401. Music Appreciation 



6 semester hours 



The course develops listening skills, familiarity with masterpieces 
of music and the understanding of form and of style which are neces- 
sary for enjoying art music. 

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE 

James B. Sullivan, Chairman 

Alfred J. Brudzynski 

Earle S. Collins 

J. Clifford Geer 

Thomas I. Ryan 

Schuyler G. Slater 

John T. Woodland 




Chemistry Class 



Science 101. Biological Science 



6 semester hours 



This course emphasizes basic biological principles common to all 
types of living things. These principles are illustrated by the study 
of the anatomy and physiology of certain examples selected from 
the major phyla of both the plant and animal kingdoms. Special 
attention is given to the study of the human organism. Some atten- 
tion is given to the principles exemplified in special fields of biology 
such as bacteriology and genetics. 



[48] 



Science 102. Physical Science 4 semester hours 

This course, taken by Business Education students, is designed to 
fit the needs of students who studied relatively little science in 
secondary schools. Some attention is given to the applications of 
science to industry and commerce, as well as to the avocational 
values of science study. Instruction is enriched with demonstrations, 
audio-visual aids, and field trips. 

Science 201. Physical Science 4 semester hours 

This course for Junior High students provides a study of the broad 
field of the physical sciences touching those phases of chemistry, 
astroncmy, and physics which have definite cultural values. Lec- 
ture-demonstrations and audio-visual aids are liberally employed. 

Science 202. Nature Study 2 semester hours 

This course provides information about trees, flowers, migration, 
hibernation, aquaria, bird identification, butterflies and moths. 
Where possible, direct contact with the materials being studied is 
provided through field trips and class demonstrations. Correct 
habits are established for self-study in the field. 

Science 305. Problems and Experiences in the 3 semester hours 
Physical Sciences 

This course is primarily concerned with getting students ready for 
a creditable performance in science-teaching in the training school; 
it is also a foundation for later professional work in the classroom. 
There is ample opportunity for amplification of background, setting 
up apparatus, giving demonstrations, and becoming familiar with 
audio-visual equipment. 

Science 306. General Chemistry 6 semester hours 

This course provides a survey of the field of inorganic chemistry, 
comprising a study of the fundamental principles of chemistry and 
their practical application. 

Science 307. Astronomy 2 semester hours 

This course provides an examination of the principal bodies of the 
solar system, of the stellar universe, and the fundamental theories 
concerning them. 

Science 308. Physical Science 6 semester hours 

(See Science 201.) This is essentially the same course as Science 
201; it is required of all Elementary students. 

[49] 



Science 401. Economic Biology 3 semester hours 

This course surveys the plant and animal world with emphasis on 
those findings of biological science which influence human existence, 
such as those which deal with food problems, health, disease, and 
heredity. Opportunity is given for research on important aspects of 
biological science which are of practical value. 

Science 403. Advanced Physical Science 3 semester hours 

This course is designed for students who wish to continue the study 
of background material for the teaching of science in the elementary 
school. Laboratory work, pertinent outside reading, and several 
field trips are part of this course. 

Science 404. General Physics 6 semester hours 

This course presents the fundamental principles of the mechanics 
of solids, liquids, and gases, wave motion and radiation, sound, heat, 
light, magnetism, and electricity. 

Science 405. Genetics 3 semester hours 

This course deals with the fundamental principles of heredity and 
variation as they have been developed through the study of plants 
and animals. 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Edna M. McGlynn, Chairman 

Lorraine Coffey 

Margaret W. Dower 

Charles F. Kiefer 

Marion S. Marshall 

Minor H. McLain 

Joseph M. Piemonte 

History 101. World History 4 or 6 semester hours 

This course aims to present a clear, concise narrative of the his- 
tory of civilization from ancient times to the present, stressing and 
interpreting social, cultural, economic, and political development. 

History 201. United States History 2 or 3 semester hours 

This course traces the growth of this nation from its humble origin 
in scattered settlements along the Atlantic seaboard and in the 
American Southwest to its emergence as the great world power of 
today. Attention is given to the forces and personalities that have 
molded American culture and stress is placed upon the development 
of an intelligent understanding of present-day United States. 

[50] 



History 202. United States Constitutional Government 

2 or 3 semester hours 

This course is primarily concerned with American political insti- 
tutions on the national level though not to the exclusion of state and 
local levels. The Federal Constitution — its origin, content, and 
interpretation; the structure and functions of government; the en- 
during principles, the persistent trends and the conflict of interests 
are dealt with on the national level. The origin and content of the 
Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the struc- 
ture and functions of state and local government agencies are also 
studied. 

History 203. World History 6 semester hours 

(See History 101) 

History 205. History of the Far East 3 semester hours 

This course surveys the history of Eastern Asia from ancient times 
to the present, with the primary emphasis upon the history of China, 
since 1912. Attention is also directed to recent developments in 
Korea, Japan, Southeast Asia and India. 

History 206. Middle East History 3 semester hours 

This course deals with the rise and expansion of Islam and its 
religious, political, social and economic significance from the seventh 
century on. The geographical areas embraced in this course are the 
Fertile Crescent, North Africa, Turkey, central Asia and India. Em- 
phasis is given to the rise of the nineteenth century Arab national- 
ism and closely follows this movement to the present day. 

History 301. International Affairs 3 semester hours 

This course makes a study of the present problems and policies 
of major European and Asiatic nations and their effect on other na- 
tions. The ideologies of communism, fascism, socialism, national- 
ism, imperialism, and internationalism are analyzed. Research 
papers are required. 

History 302. Problems in American History 

3 or 5 semester hours 

This course deals with American social, political and economic 
problems, approached primarily through contemporary writings — 
letters, diaries, autobiographies, newspapers, and official documents. 
Attention is given to the circumstances out of which the problems 
arose, and to the conflicting and contrasting points of view concern- 
ing the issues and proposals, past and present, for alleviation or 
elimination. 

[51] 



History 303. United States History 3 semester hours 

(See History 201) 

History 304. United States Constitutional Government 

3 semester hours 
(See History 202) 

History 401. International Affairs 3 semester hours 

(See History 301) 

Economics 401. Principles and Problems of Economics 

3 semester hours 

This course is a study of the structure of the United States' capi- 
talistic system as it functions in current economic situations. The 
topics discussed are analysis of national income; the price mechan- 
ism, competitive and monopolistic forms; currency, credit, and bank- 
ing; labor unions; and the distribution of income among the factors 
of production. Newspapers and current materials are used for illus- 
trative purposes. 

Sociology 301. Principles and Problems of Sociology 

3 semester hours 

The student considers modern man and his culture, analyzing re- 
lationship between present-day culture and heredity, environment, 
race, and population. To understand better the nature of man and 
his culture, the student examines basic facts concerning prehistoric 
and primitive man. Present social problems are considered through- 
out the course to enable the student to see practical applications of 
sociological principles. Research papers are required. 

Sociology 401. Principles and Problems of Sociology 

3 semester hours 
(See Sociology 301 ) 

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH 

Lillian M. Hoff, Chairman 
Matthew E. Cooney, Jr. 
Marion S. Marshall 

Speech 101. Fundamentals of Speech 1 semester hour 

This course is planned to develop greater efficiency in oral ex- 
pression by the elimination of common speech errors and undesir- 
able mannerisms. The course will acquaint the student with me- 
chanics of correct speech and will attempt to eliminate defects in 
voice and posture. 

[52] 



Speech 302. Speech Construction and Delivery 1 semester hour 

This course is planned to provide practical training in the prepara- 
tion and delivery of various types of speeches; to teach platform 
courtesy and procedures; to give facility in discussion and in the 
organization and presentation of classroom materials; and to de- 
velop in the student the ability to speak easily, confidently, and 
forcefully. 

Speech 401. Dramatics, Debating, and Platform Oratory 

1 semester hour 

This course is concerned with the oral interpretation of literature, 
dramatics in school programs, platform work, methods of debate, 
and simple techniques of interviewing. The course aims to help 
student teachers in the techniques of teaching speech to children. 



[53]